Texas A&M University-Texarkana
Biology Department

 

Biology Course list

1106. Biology for Science Majors I Lab. This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes the process of scientific inquiry, important concepts in biochemistry and genetics and introduction to laboratory techniques. Concurrent enrollment in the lecture portion BIOL 1306 is recommended in order to gain maximum benefit from this course (1 SCH).
 
1107. Biology for Science Majors II Lab. This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes a survey of plants, animals, and microorganisms as well as studies of basic biological processes such as digestion, circulation, and nervous system function. Concurrent enrollment in the lecture portion BIOL 1307 is recommended in order to gain maximum benefit from this course (1 SCH).

1306. Biology for Science Majors I. This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes the chemistry of life, the cell, genetics and mechanisms of evolution. Concurrent enrollment in the laboratory portion BIOL 1106 is recommended in order to gain maximum benefit from this course.

1307. Biology for Science Majors II. This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes plant form and function, animal form and function and ecology. Concurrent enrollment in the laboratory portion BIOL 1107 is recommended in order to gain maximum benefit from this course.

1308. Biology for Non-Science Majors I. This course introduces to the student the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes the chemistry of life, the cell, genetics, and mechanisms of evolution.

1309. Biology for Non-Science Majors II. This course introduces to the student the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1308.

2401. Human Anatomy & Physiology I. Basic human anatomy and physiological principles focusing on the cellular and tissue levels and their integration into the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306.

2402. Human Anatomy & Physiology II. Basic human anatomy and physiological principles focusing on the nervous, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, urinary, and reproductive organs. Prerequisite: BIOL 2401.

2406. Environmental Biology. This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of environmental biology, ecology, and the relationship between humans and the natural world. This course will provide an understanding of bio-diversity of the interactions of ecosystem components. Conservation, pollution, energy, and other contemporary ecological problems will also be addressed. (4 SCH) Corequisite: MATH 1314 or higher.

289. Independent Study. Independent study in Biology. May be repeated when topics vary.

307. General Ecology. The principles of ecology, with special reference to populations and their ecosystems, distribution, biotic communities, and environmental relationships. Field trips required. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and 1106, and 1307 and 1107.

308. Invertebrate Zoology. Explore the diversity of invertebrate types, morphologically, embryologically, and physiologically. The ecological role of invertebrates will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and 1106, and 1307 and 1107.

310. Genetics. Principles of heredity and variation and their application to plants, lower animals, and man. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and 1106, and 1307 and 1107.

311. General Microbiology. Introduction to modern microbiology with emphasis on prokaryotes; includes microbial cell structures and function, physiology and metabolism, nutrition, ecology, and growth; taxonomy, genetics, and evolution; bacteriophages and viruses. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and 1106, and 1307 and 1107.

402. Cell and Molecular Biology. A study of the morphology and physiology of the cell and cell organelles, including basic facts, concepts, and problems in modern biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and 1106, and 1307 and 1107.

410. Biochemistry I. BIOL 410 is the first semester of a one-year course. The first semester covers the structure, function, and metabolism of amino acids and proteins and simple and complex carbohydrates. Emphasis will be on understanding biochemistry from a biological point of view and on providing information on how biochemical events are regulated in living tissues. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I and II and Organic Chemistry I and II. Cross-listed with CHEM 410.

411. Biochemistry II. BIOL 411 is the second semester of a one-year course. The second semester covers the structure, function, and metabolism of lipids and nucleic acids. Emphasis will be on understanding biochemistry from a biological point of view and on providing information on how biochemical events are regulated in living tissues. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, and Biochemistry I. Cross-listed with CHEM 411.

420. Global Change. This course will focus on global change.  Major topics covered include: Climate Change, Sea Level Change/Coastal Inundations, Ocean Acidification, and Permafrost and the Changing Arctic.  

421. Endangered Ecosystems.  This course will focus on endangered ecosystems and organisms from around the world.  Coral Reefs, Brazilian Rainsforest Destruction, Amphibian Crisis and the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone will be studied in detail.

464. Independent Research. Research in biology conducted under faculty guidance. Prerequisite: Two semesters of biology and instructor permission.

466. Evolutionary Biology. Basic principles, mechanisms, and patterns of evolutionary biology including a historical survey of related ideas. Prerequisite: Two semesters of biology.

472. Introduction to Forensic Science. The study of basic concepts, techniques, practices, and procedures of criminalistics, including the most current technologies in forensic analysis. Criminal investigation of actual cases will be discussed with a minimum of scientific terminology. In addition, the nature of physical evidence will be emphasized, including the use of DNA profiling. Strongly recommended for Criminal Justice majors and Pre-Allied Health track students in Biology. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. Cross-listed with CJ 472 and CHEM 472.

481. Seminar in Biology. Student participation in general and specific topics in biology. May be repeated in a different topic. Usually taken during last semester or last year. Prerequisite: Senior standing.
 
489. Independent Study. Individual instruction. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: Two semesters of biology and instructor permission.

490. Introduction to Biotechnology. This course will explore the principles and applications of DNA science with special reference to recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisite: CHEM 410 and CHEM 411, OR BIOL 410 and BIOL 411. Cross- listed with CHEM 490.

497. Special Topics. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

515. Darwin and the Origin of Species. This course will focus on Darwin’s hypotheses and compare his ideas with modern developments in the study of biological evolution.

520. Global Change. This course will focus on global change.  Major topics covered include: Climate Change, Sea Level Change/Coastal Inundations, Ocean Acidification, and Permafrost and the Changing Arctic (Cross-listed with Biology 420).  

521. Endangered Ecosystems.  This course will focus on endangered ecosystems and organisms from around the world.  Coral Reefs, Brazilian Rainsforest Destruction, Amphibian Crisis and the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone will be studied in detail (Cross-listed with Biology 420).