Texas A&M University-Texarkana
Biology Department

 

Chemistry Course list

1111. General Chemistry I Lab. (1-1). This course introduces students to basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in CHEM 1311. The students will be introduced to the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.
Corequisite: CHEM 1311.

1112. General Chemistry II Lab. (1-1). This course introduces students to basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in CHEM 1312. The students will be introduced to the scientific method, experimental design, chemical instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Corequisite: CHEM 1312.

1117. General Chemistry for Engineering Students Lab. (2-2). This course introduces students to basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in CHEM 1307. The students will be introduced to the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Corequisite: CHEM 1307.

1307. General Chemistry for Engineering Students. This course is intended to provide engineering students with a background in important concepts and principles of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on those areas considered most relevant in an engineering context, and practical applications in engineering and
technology will be examined. Corequisite: MATH 1314 or MATH 2412. High school chemistry is strongly recommended.

1311. General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry for majors in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering; topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Corequisite: MATH 1314 or MATH 2412.

1312. General Chemistry II. This course is the second semester of general chemistry sequence: topics include chemical equilibrium, phase diagrams and spectrometry, acid-base concepts, thermodynamics, kinetics,
electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1111 and 1311; Corequisite: CHEM 1112.

2423. Organic Chemistry I. (3-2). This course is the first of a comprehensive and somewhat rigorous survey of organic chemistry emphasizing nomenclature, structure, properties, synthesis, and reaction mechanisms of carbon compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 1312 passed with grade C or better.

2425. Organic Chemistry II. (3-2). This course is the second semester of Organic Chemistry sequence emphasizing the classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds that contain oxygen and nitrogen. Prerequisite: CHEM 2423 passed with grade C or better.

340. Quantitative Chemical and Instrumental Analysis. Fundamental theory and techniques in traditional chemical analysis. Topics include sampling and separation methods, measurements, statistics, equilibrium and pH studies, gravimetric and combustion analysis, electrochemical techniques, and introduction to instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHEM 1312 with a grade of C or better.

351. Physical Chemistry I. This course introduces students to the field of physical chemistry. The students will be introduced to fundamental theories of chemistry involving a detailed study of the properties of matter in the gaseous, liquid, and solid states. Properties of solutions, colloids, and elementary principles of
thermodynamics and thermochemistry are given extensive consideration. Prerequisite: CHEM 1312, MATH 2413 and 2414 with grade of C or better.

405. Environmental Chemistry. (3-3). This is an application of chemical principles to the study of the environment. It includes natural processes and pollution problems related to air, water and soil. Prerequisites: CHEM 1311, CHEM 1312, CHEM 2423 and CHEM 340--all passed with a C or better.; Corequisite: CHEM 351.
 
410. Biochemistry I. (3-3). BIOL 410 is the first semester of a one-year course. The first semester covers the structure and function of amino and nucleic acids, proteins, simple and complex carbohydrates, and lipids and cell membranes. Emphasis will be on understanding biochemistry from a biological point of view and on providing information on how biochemical events are regulated in living tissues. Prerequisites: CHEM 1311, CHEM 1312, CHEM 2423, and CHEM 2425--all passed with a grade of C or better. Cross-listed with BIOL 410.

411. Biochemistry II. (3-3). BIOL 411 is the second semester of a one-year course. The second semester covers enzymes kinetics and metabolism of amino and nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.  Emphasis will be on understanding biochemistry from a biological point of view and on providing
information on how biochemical events are regulated in living tissues. Prerequisites: BIOL 410 or CHEM 410 passed with grade C or better. Cross-listed with BIOL 411.

472. Introduction for Forensic Science. (2-2). The study of basic concepts, techniques, practices, and procedures of criminalistics, including the most current technologies in forensic analysis. Criminal investigation of actual cases will be discussed with a minimum of scientific terminology. In addition, the nature of physical evidence will be emphasized, including the use of DNA profiling. Strongly recommended for Criminal Justice majors and Pre-Allied Health track students in Biology. Prerequisite: CHEM 1311 and BIOL 1306. Cross-listed with BIOL 472 and CJ 472.
 
489. Independent Study. Individual instruction. May be repeated when topics vary.

490. Introduction to Biotechnology. This course will explore the principles and applications of DNA science with special reference to recombinant DNA technology as the platform for on-step production of biofuels and renewable chemicals. Prerequisite: CHEM 410, CHEM 411, OR BIOL 410 and BIOL 411. Crosslisted with BIOL 490.